The focus of the AFE Group is to generate knowledge and develop state-of-the-art modeling tools to advance the scientific community and support policies that enable better understanding and management of global and regional agriculture, forestry, and natural land ecosystems.

The basis for improved assessment and management of natural resources is a deep understanding of complex and interacting biophysical processes within terrestrial ecosystems. The AFE Group aims to achieve a leading position in addressing research questions requiring integrated analyses of agriculture, forestry, and natural land ecosystems at global and regional levels.

The group’s strategic ambition of biophysical tool integration for, among others, the assessment of nature-based/climate solutions, landscape restoration options, agro-forestry, or future cropland management, is at the core of the IIASA research domain on biodiversity and ecosystem services. With sustainability and biodiversity aspects as cross-cutting environmental safeguards, the group is closely aligned with the strategic direction of its host program on Biodiversity and Natural Resources. This structural and strategic setup will ensure that AFE becomes a valuable research pillar and contributor to the overarching IIASA strategy.

Models, tools, datasets

Pine tree forest

Russian Forests and Forestry Database

Forest burning

Wildfire climate impacts and adaptation model (FLAM)

Forestry and logging

Global Forest Model (G4M)

Fields

The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate-based global gridded crop model (EPIC-IIASA)

Projects

Lamasus

Land Management for Sustainability (LAMASUS)

Forest Fire in the summer season

Integrated Future Wildfire Hot Spot Mapping for Austria (Austria Fire Futures )

Extreme events

The Human-Tech Nexus - Building a Safe Haven to Cope with Climate Extremes (HuT)

Tropical Forest and deforested area

RESTORE+: Addressing Landscape Restoration on Degraded Land in Indonesia and Brazil

Staff

Oskar Franklin profile picture

Oskar Franklin

Senior Research Scholar (AFE)

Juraj Balkovic profile picture

Juraj Balkovic

Senior Research Scholar (AFE)

Athipthep Boonman profile picture

Athipthep Boonman

Guest Research Assistant (AFE)

Christian Folberth profile picture

Christian Folberth

Senior Research Scholar (AFE)

News

taking a soil sample for a soil test in a field.

14 May 2024

Study confirms giant store of global soil carbon and highlights its dynamic nature

Discussions around soil carbon have traditionally revolved around organic matter, overlooking the substantial contribution of soil inorganic carbon. A recent study published in Science by an international team of researchers, however, addresses this oversight.
Forrest

07 May 2024

TaigaClimate Project Meeting 2024

The Agriculture, Forestry, and Ecosystem Services (AFE) group has hosted researchers from Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency as part of the TaigaClimate project meeting from 29 to 30 April. 
FLAM team at EGU24

23 April 2024

FLAM Goes EGU: Exploring Wildfire Research in 2024

The annual European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly took place from April 14-19, 2024, in Vienna. The FLAM Team participated significantly as conveners, oral presenters, and poster exhibitors in various sessions.

Focus

09 April 2024

Forest science and education in Ukraine: Priorities for action

Ukraine’s forest sector is suffering unprecedented challenges. War has impacted both forests and forestry – devastating forest areas, infrastructure and industry, as well as causing ‘brain drain’ and capacity loss due to the disruption of research institutions and the displacement of students and scientists. These impacts are compounded by factors including climate change, unstable forest health dynamics, landscape fires, and an overall decrease in forest productivity.
Pine trees
Amazon forest

24 February 2022

The number of tree species on Earth

Since humans have walked this planet, we have loved categorizing things and ecology is no exception. One of the most basic ecological questions has always been the simple question of “how many?”

Publications