Social Cohesion, Health, and Wellbeing (SHAW)

The SHAW Group’s research activities directly and comprehensively addresses the measurement of human wellbeing in its multiple dimensions with a special focus on health as a key component and social cohesion as a key determinant of wellbeing.

© Pogonici | Dreamstime

© Pogonici | Dreamstime

SHAW employs various demographic methods, statistical techniques, and empirical concepts to comprehensively assess different dimensions of good health and wellbeing, while also considering equity in the distribution of wellbeing over time and over the life course for different populations around the world. In doing so, the group aims to develop alternative indicators of wellbeing to effectively measure development progress. The aim is for such indicators of wellbeing to be applied as long-term sustainability criteria that can help to pinpoint vulnerable subgroups of populations for policy priorities. Due to the group’s strong focus on sustainable human wellbeing, particular attention is paid to the feedback of emerging situations such as pandemics, economic crises, and extreme weather events that can pose risks to human health and wellbeing.

Latest news:

16 March 2021
A new way to measure human wellbeing towards sustainability

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a blueprint to achieve a better life for all and to ensure that no one is left behind. The partly overlapping and contradictory objectives of the SDGs can however make it difficult to assess overall progress. A group of researchers have proposed a new, tailor-made metric that measures development based on long-term human wellbeing.  More

11 February 2021
Raising climate ambitions could save millions of lives

Adopting policies that are consistent with achieving the Paris Agreement and prioritize health, could annually save 6.4 million lives due to healthier diets, 1.6 million lives due to cleaner air, and 2.1 million lives due to increased physical activity, according to new research.  More

09 February 2021
Quality education essential to closing the growing global skills gap

With rapid educational expansion in many developing countries, much progress has been made in terms of access to education. According to a new IIASA-led study, being in school is however not the same as learning and this expansion in quantity may come at the expense of quality, with the possible negative implications of the current COVID-19 pandemic on schooling possibly exacerbating the situation.  More



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Last edited: 13 April 2021

CONTACT DETAILS

Wolfgang Lutz

Senior Program Advisor:Acting Research Group Leader

Population and Just Societies Program|Social Cohesion

Health

and Wellbeing Research Group

T +43(0) 2236 807 294

Katja Scherbov

Program and Project Officer

Population and Just Societies Program

T +43(0) 2236 807 280

PUBLICATIONS

Rockström, J., Gupta, J., Lenton, T.M., Qin, D., Lade, S.J., Abrams, J.F., Jacobson, L., Rocha, J.C., et al. (2021). Identifying a safe and just corridor for people and the planet. Earth's Future 9 (4), e2020EF001866. 10.1029/2020EF001866.

Balachandran, A., James, K.S., van Wissen, L., K.C., S., & Janssen, F. (2021). Can changes in education alter future population ageing in Asia and Europe? Journal of Biosocial Science, 1-13. 10.1017/S0021932021000134. (In Press)

Boza-Kiss, B., Pachauri, S. , & Zimm, C. (2021). Deprivations and Inequities in Cities Viewed Through a Pandemic Lens. Frontiers in Sustainable Cities 3, e645914. 10.3389/frsc.2021.645914.

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
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