Chris Heyes profile picture

Chris Heyes

Emeritus Research Scholar

Pollution Management Research Group

Energy, Climate, and Environment Program

Biography

Chris Heyes is an Emeritus Research Scholar in the Pollution Management Research Group of the Energy, Climate, and Environment Program. He has been working at IIASA in the former Air Quality and Greenhouse Gases (AIR) Program and its forerunners since 1993.

His original focus was the development of a simplified ozone formation module for the RAINS/GAINS integrated assessment model. Subsequently, he has been involved in various elements of the further enhancement of the GAINS model and its application to air quality policy questions, mostly in the areas of atmospheric dispersion and environmental impacts. He has made significant contributions to the extension of the RAINS/GAINS model to include particulate matter and the development of online versions of the model. More recent activities include the implementation of radiative forcing impacts from relatively short-lived species to extend the model's capability to assess interactions between air quality and climate policies, and the generation of global emission fields.

Heyes studied chemistry at Oxford University, UK, where he received his BA degree. Subsequently, he carried out research on aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of chlorofluorocarbons relevant to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Before joining IIASA, he worked at the former Warren Spring Laboratory, Stevenage, UK, gaining experience in a wide range of air pollution problems ranging from odor abatement to acid deposition and air quality modeling.

Last update: 29 JUN 2021

Publications

Huang, Y., Partha, D.B., Harper, K., & Heyes, C. (2021). Impacts of Global Solid Biofuel Stove Emissions on Ambient Air Quality and Human Health. GeoHealth 5 (3) e2020GH000362. 10.1029/2020GH000362.

IEA, (2021). Net Zero by 2050: A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector. International Energy Agency

Evangeliou, N., Grythe, H., Klimont, Z. , Heyes, C. , Eckhardt, S., Lopez-Aparicio, S., & Stohl, A. (2020). Atmospheric transport is a major pathway of microplastics to remote regions. Nature Communications 11 (1) 10.1038/s41467-020-17201-9.

Huang, Y., Unger, N., Harper, K., & Heyes, C. (2020). Global Climate and Human Health Effects of the Gasoline and Diesel Vehicle Fleets. GeoHealth 4 (3) e2019GH000240. 10.1029/2019GH000240.