IIASA Population and Just Societies Program Research Scholar Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz has been elected to the Academia Europaea

Alexia © Puiu

The Academia Europaea is the Pan-European Academy of Sciences Humanities and Letters with more than 4500 members who are leading experts from the physical sciences and technology, biological sciences and medicine, mathematics, the letters and humanities, social and cognitive sciences, economics and the law. The object of Academia Europaea is the advancement and propagation of excellence in scholarship in the humanities, law, the economic, social, and political sciences, mathematics, medicine, and all branches of natural and technological sciences anywhere in the world for the public benefit and for the advancement of the education of the European public of all ages in these subjects.

On May 24th, following a rigorous peer-review process the Board of Trustees elected 470 eminent international scholars as new members.  Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz was elected as a member of Economics, Business and Management Sciences section. Prof. Fürnkranz-Prskawetz was recognized for her significant contributions to the fields of population economics, demography, optimal control theory, nonlinear dynamic models and life cycle models. She is a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (corresponding member since 2007 and full member since 2011) and Leopoldina-German National Academy of Sciences (since 2015).

Read here the press release issued by the Executive Secretary of the Academy.

We extend our warmest congratulations to Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz on this prestigious appointment.

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